Reading Response 6

I don’t know how much more I can say about the videos and articles I chose, other than that they didn’t say anything I disagreed with. Besides Angélica Dass’s presentation, I read Ersula Ore’s article, “They Call Me Dr. Ore,” and the article and video by Sarah J. Arroyo and Bahareh Alaei, titled “One More Video Theory: Some Assemblage Required.”

Now I say there wasn’t anything I disagreed with, but there were definitely elements that made me uncomfortable, probably by design. Both Dass and Ore talked about personal experiences with discrimination growing up, and in their adult lives. Me, I’ve never felt that I’ve been discriminated against in my life. I don’t know why that is; maybe the military communities where we lived just tended towards tolerance; maybe being a lone group of Americans in a foreign country encouraged sticking together; maybe I’m just sheltered. The uncomfortable thing is that these and other accounts make me think more and more that, with the racial climate being what it is today…my luck is bound to run out.

While I’m writing this another idea occurs to me, based on the Arroyo/Alaei article. Maybe I have been discriminated against, but I’ve simply taken it out of the context of conflict where discrimination usually resides, and treated it as absurd. Laughed at it. That’s a long maybe, though; I feel like I’d know if someone was really applying racial prejudices toward me.

But now that I’ve thought about it, I appreciate this string of rhetorical pieces. Even though Ore and Dass left with me with a sense of nervous anticipation, “Some Assemblage Required” takes an interesting approach for dispelling that, not by equipping the viewer with statistics or facts that they might use to fight prejudice directly, but by suggesting the alternative of treating ideologies of hate with levity and dismissal. I guess only time will tell which experience proves to be more applicable.

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